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CultureRights & dissent This article is part of the series Humour

This week’s Visual Sunday is a tribute to all cartoonists, caricaturists and creative artists who have been busier than ever this past year. Their work has captured the spirit of the revolutions and had us stop and smile in the midst of all the turmoil. The collection below is just a tiny selection of what’s out there — go discover! 

Carlos Latuff is a Brazilian political cartoonist who has been published in independent media across the world. Since the revolutions started, he has drawn an impressive number of graphics that he shares through his Twitter account.

Kharabeesh is a young creative cartoons collective. During the past year, they produced several revolution-themed short animations.

Syrian caricaturist Ali Farzat is a renowned political commentator who has published over 15,000 cartoons in different Syrian, Arab and international newspapers. In August, Farzat was pulled from his car, beaten up badly and left on the side of a road in Damascus.

In Saudi Arabia, the struggle for 100% rights to 100% of the population continues. Sarah Mohanna Al Abdali, a creative mind based in Jeddah, did this graphic at the end of last year.

“Today, in our country, there is freedom and democracy like never before,” says Interior Minister Idris Naim Sahin / “All opposing journalists are in jail” / “We have never been that free”

Meanwhile in Turkey, a country increasingly more often cited as a model for the burgeouning Arab democracies. This is the renowned satirical weekly Penguen delivering a comment on freedom of the press in the country.

Tunisia, Egypt, Algeria, Yemen, Jordan. Meanwhile in Lebanon: “If only we also had a dictator against whom the people could unite”.

Mazen Kerbaj is one of Beirut’s most productive artists. He is a musician, painter and cartoonist who always delivers smart and satirical commentary. This cartoon was posted in February with the greeting “To my lucky Arab friends”.

 

More from Lebanon. This time a hilarious and — as always when they are involved — very smart comment on the Lebanese-Syrian political game by Qifa Nabki and Maya Zankoul. Find the original post here.

 

 

ِEgypt’s Revolution Artists Union was founded on 3 February outside the KFC restaurant on Tahrir. During the November demonstrations, they again set up their makeshift studio on the square, gathering creative activists to produce art for the revolution.

 

Mustafa Hussein is a journalist, artist and long-time cartoonist who makes some of the most popular political caricatures in Egypt. This one is a lesson in beards favoured by different Egyptian men. From right to left: Salafi-style beard; Marxist beard; artsy beard; beard that has not been trimmed for a while.

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